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Reflecting on Vimy: local perspective

 Ashli Barrett/Lacombe Globe

The Adelphi Hotel, pictured here in 1930 was the location of the first Vimy Dinners which commemorated the war and battle locally. (Lacombe and District Historical Society)

The Adelphi Hotel, pictured here in 1930 was the location of the first Vimy Dinners which commemorated the war and battle locally. (Lacombe and District Historical Society)

Everyone is invited to explore the Battle of Vimy Ridge through the lens of community residents during and after the battle.

 

Reflections on Vimy, A Local Perspective of Vimy Ridge is an exhibit currently featured at the Lacombe Memorial Centre which opened in conjunction with the designation of the Lacombe Cenotaph in early October.

“Vimy was such a significant event in Canada’s history that we wanted to see what the tie and meaning was for the community today and in the past,” said Marie Péron, executive director of the Lacombe and District Historical Society.

“Not only did we talk about the Battle of Vimy Ridge and context of WWI, but we went into what it meant for the community at the time and how people commemorated what happened in the aftermath.”

This required a lot of research, which was taken up by Paige Mansell, one of the historical society’s volunteers, who spearheaded the project and put the exhibit together.

Unique images from the Canadian War Museum are featured, showcasing the scale and introducing a battle which has become integral in the shaping of Canadian identity.

Beyond that, it talks about remembrance locally through “Vimy Dinners” which began in 1930, the Lacombe Cenotaph, which was unveiled in 1924 and the Canadian National Vimy Memorial, whose progress was covered by the Lacombe Globe’s predecessor, The Western Globe, as 13 locals were buried in the cemetery there.

Locals include Alexander Dick, Robert Drader, James Fleming, Edward Howard, Clarence Llod, Thomas MacAldin, Lawrence Nicholls, Harry Sanderson, Albred Scott, Clement Short, Andrews Struthers, Foster Thompson and Mark Tredwell.

They also did a survey of local residents now, and what Vimy means today. Results are included in the exhibit.

The last day to view the exhibit at the LMC will be Nov. 12. Then, it will move to the Flat Iron Museum and Interpretive Centre where it will remain for the month of December and into the new year.

The exhibit is also up for travelling, with the Millet Museum already approaching them to exhibit it in time for Remembrance Day next year.

Those wishing to browse the exhibit in detail and at their own leisure are invited to view it online as well at http://mhma3.blogspot.ca/p/virtual-exhibits.html or http://virtualexhibits.blogspot.ca/2017/09/reflections-on-vimy.html



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